COBA

Ph.D. Program in Logistics and Supply Chain Management

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The objective of the Ph.D. in Logistics and Supply Chain Management is to develop scholars who generate and disseminate new knowledge by conducting high-quality research and teach at the university level. The Ph.D. program is delivered via traditional course work and other research initiatives with faculty in the College of Business Administration. By retaining a residence teaching/learning model, the program capitalizes on individualized student development through constant interaction in a supportive environment of mentors and colleagues.

The program requires at least 60 credit hours, provided the student has a master’s in business from an institution accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB). Students without a core understanding of major business areas may require up to an additional 18 graduate credit hours.

First Year
BUSA 9332 – Applied Multivariate Methods for Business Research
LSCM 9031 – Research Processes and Philosophies in Supply Chain Management
LSCM 9630 – Supply Chain Management Theories
BUSA 9333 – Advanced Multivariate Methods for Business
BUSA 9334 – Qualitative Research Methods in Business
+ 1 or 2 LSCM Seminars

Second Year
LSCM 9331 – Analysis of Secondary Data for Supply Chain Management Research
+3 or 4 LSCM Seminars
+ 1 or 2 Electives (focused methods or directed study);
Comprehensive Exams Summer of 2nd year

Third and Fourth Years
Dissertation (18-36 credit hrs) + Teaching (approximate average of 1 section/semester)

Course Descriptions

LSCM 9031 – Research Processes and Philosophies in Supply Chain Management (3)
This course will introduce students to issues related to the accumulation and dissemination of knowledge; basic nature of theory and its elements; the range of research approaches found in Supply Chain Management research; measurement fundamentals; reliability and validity issues; technical issues such as power analysis, effect-size estimation and moderation/mediation analysis.

LSCM 9131 – Logistics Management (3)
Key topics and concepts of business logistics are surveyed through readings, discussions, critiques and presentations of established academic articles in logistics and supply chain management.

LSCM 9331 – Analysis of Secondary Data for Supply Chain Management Research (3)
This course will introduce students to the process of utilizing secondary data sources in Supply Chain Management research. Topics include: primary differences between utilizing primary and secondary data sources for Supply Chain Management research; conceptualization of research models, including proxy variable formation; identification of potential data sources; manipulation of large datasets and a variety of methodological approaches commonly utilized with secondary data.

LSCM 9630 – Supply Chain Management Theories (3)
This course is designed to provide a survey of key supply chain related theories. Particular emphasis will be placed on understanding the scholarly foundations and perspectives of supply chain management theory and its application in supply chain research. Among the theories covered are Transaction Cost Economics, Resource Based View, Contingency Theory, Agency Theory, Social Exchange Theory, Social Network Theory, and Systems Theory.

LSCM 9631 – Supply Management (3)
Foundational and emerging supply management research topics will be reviewed, presented, discussed and critiqued. Scope will span the evolution of supply management and its role in the firm, and then moves into critical topics such as buyer-supplier relationships, sourcing strategies, and emerging topics.

LSCM 9633 – Research Trends in Logistics (3)
Trending and emerging topics in business logistics research are surveyed through readings, discussions, critiques and presentations of academic articles in logistics and supply chain management.

LSCM 9634 – Supply Chain Management Research (3)
Explores conceptual frameworks and inter-organizational challenges studied in extant supply chain management literature. Frameworks covered will include those of the Global Supply Chain Forum, the Demand and and Supply Integration Framework, the Supply Chain Operating Reference Model, the Value Chain. Representative Inter-organizational issues including collaboration, coordination, integration, risk, disruptions flexibility and resilience, technology adoption, sustainability, channel management, and the bull-whip effect.

LSCM 9662 – Operations Management (3)
Current and emerging operations management research topics will be reviewed, presented, discussed and critiqued. In the process, students will be exposed to a number of seminal articles selected based on evidence of a novel approach to either domain knowledge and/or research methods. This course will help develop skill sets in conducting independent research, critiquing articles, developing new research ideas and implementing a research study ready to be submitted to a journal.

BUSA 9332 – Applied Multivariate Methods for Business Research (3)
This course will enable students to master the analytical/methodological skills needed to evaluate and conduct research in their areas of specialization. Students will be introduced to multivariate data analysis methods,especially linear models, needed in their research areas. Students should be able to apply appropriate multivariate statistical techniques to analyze real data sets and prepare methodology and results appropriate for business journals. Students will be able to understand the multivariate techniques commonly used in current literatures of their research areas.

BUSA 9333 – Advanced Multivariate Methods for Business (3)
This course will enable students to master the analytical/methodological skills needed to evaluate and conduct research in their areas of specialization. Students will explore common multivariate data analysis methods needed in their research areas. Students will be able to apply appropriate multivariate statistical techniques to analyze real data sets, prepare methodology and results portions of articles appropriate for publishing in business journals. Students will be able to understand the multivariate techniques used in current literatures in their research areas.

BUSA 9334 – Qualitative Research Methods in Business (3)
This course provides a survey of qualitative research philosophies and methods. Its focus is on the use of qualitative research to understand phenomenon generally considered within the domain of logistics and supply chain management. The majority of the time will be spent comparing and contrasting four main approaches to qualitative research — grounded theory, case studies, focus groups, and phenomenology — to illustrate the variations on qualitative research available. Although philosophical foundations are discussed, the course places primary emphasis on the application of qualitative research methods. Of particular emphasis are decisions and activities that the qualitative researcher must accomplish, such as selecting a phenomenon for study, determining research objectives and questions, selecting a qualitative research design, choosing data sources, conducting a long interview, analyzing qualitative data, evaluating qualitative research, and writing and reporting the results.

Focused Methods (3-6 hrs)
Additional depth in any method suitable for LSCM research in College of Business or across the university. To be arranged and subject to program’s administrative approval.

Directed Study (3-6 hrs)
Project-based, independent, special topics or other studies available and approved prior to or along with dissertation work. Must be suitable for LSCM research and offered in College of Business or across the university. To be arranged and subject to program’s administrative approval.

LSCM 9999 – Dissertation (a minimum of 18 total hours)

Last updated: 12/8/2016

Department of Logistics & Supply Chain Management • PO Box 8036 Statesboro, GA 30460 • (912) 478-1498 • coba@georgiasouthern.edu